Wednesday, June 7, 2017

That Redshank

Two days of stormy weather have left me indoors. And then tomorrow the forecast is for rain all day and more over the weekend. Is it really June? 

On Saturday last I posted a photograph of a colour ringed Redshank that I saw on a journey through the Forest of Bowland on 4th June, http://anotherbirdblog.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/saturday-sport.html

I followed the sighting up through the Internet and discovered more information via the Farlington Ringing Group. The group of ringers operate on the south coast of England. See below for the full set of information on the Redshank. It shows how effective colour ringing can be in tracking individual birds.

Redshank DD51107

Ringed as an adult in September 2009, Redshank DD51107 is now at least 9 years old and has been re-sighted in the Chichester area of the Sussex coast between August and March in every intervening year. It was noted there in February 2017 and probably moved up to Bowland in March or April where it began its breeding cycle.

Redshank - Chichester to Lancashire

When I saw the bird on 4th June it was clearly on territory from the behaviour displayed – using a line of fence posts which acted as lookout to spot and to warn of predators. 

Redshank
 
The Redshanks that breed in inland and upland parts of the UK are known to move to the coast for winter where studies show that the species is very site faithful from one winter to the next, as perfectly detailed in the chart above. Almost certainly this Redshank is equally true to its summertime home in Bowland. 

If I get up the in the next week or two I shall look out for it but even as early as July it may have left on its journey to the south of England. 

Redshank

But then all Redshanks don't wear such obvious bling.

Linking today to Anni's Birding and Eileen's Saturday Blog.


16 comments:

Linda said...

Lovely photos, Phil! It seems that no matter what size a bird is, they all sleep on one foot. :)

KK said...

I was not aware we had such great technology at such great scale for tracking birds. I thought only big universities and governments could afford tagging big animals like tigers and crocodiles/muggers.

I hope the weather improves and that you get to sight and study a lot!

Gordon said...

That is really briliant info Phil, thanks a lot for your resrch.
All the best Gordon.

Margaret Adamson said...

Great post on the Redshank Stuart

Patrycja P. said...

Interesting post. We can learn a lot about birds thanks to the ringing it. Greetings!

Lowcarb team member said...

Yes, our UK weather over these last few days has been awful ... howling winds and heavy rain ... where is summer???

But back to your post - some great pictures - love the one on one leg!
Great information to.

All the best Jan

Stuart Price said...

Lancashire and Chichester.....2 places I know..........maybe it likes yachting in the winter.

Rajesh said...

Good to see this bird.

Hootin' ♥ Anni said...

So very interesting. And being it was ringed 9 years ago, that is GOOD isn't it? To survive that many years?

Beautiful bird Phil.

eileeninmd said...

Hello Phil, it is great to seeing these ringed birds. The Redshank is beautiful too. Great photos and post. Thank you so much for linking up and sharing your post. Happy Saturday! Wishing you a happy weekend!

sandyland said...

my favorite kind

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

That's excellent! Love your photos...hope the sun comes out and you can get out again soon!

David Gascoigne said...

Hello Phil: Great account of the peregrinations of this Common Redshank. Have you perchance read "Moonbird," the account of a Red Knot journeying from the southern tip of South America way up to the Arctic and back? During its lifetime, at the time the book was published in 2012, it had flown the equivalent distance of a journey to the moon and half way back.

♥ Anni ♥ said...

I've returned once again to say "Thanks for linking in and sharing your experiences and photos with us at I'd Rather B Birdin'!!"

A Colorful World said...

Tracking the Redshank! I love it. So interesting.

Mary Cromer said...

Just wonderful, absolutely brilliant stats, 9 years and counting ;)

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