Monday, December 9, 2013

On The Road Again

Last Thursday was a hell of a stormy day. As the tempest raged all around the stowed away barbecue and gas bottle blew across the patio with an almighty crash while the grandkids’ Wendy House relocated to the furthest extremes of the garden. Thankfully there was no structural or personal damage and the break in birding allowed me to complete other tasks. 

Then my back started to give me grief stopping my birding activities for a few days. So today I was determined to get out come what may, so swallowed took a few painkillers and set off for Pilling. 

There was evidence of the storm all along and the sea wall, smashed fencing, piles of debris and broken trees swept up the embankment to come to rest at the newly claimed high water mark. There’s a Whooper Swan picture centre. In fact there were 13 Whoopers, 45 Shelduck, 22 Pink-footed Geese and a couple of Jackdaws on the pools, all except the swan flying off at my arrival. 

High Water Mark - Pilling

Whooper Swan

Whooper Swans

The hedgerow, the maize and stubble field revealed more: 1 Reed Bunting, 40 Linnet, 6 Skylark, 3 Meadow Pipit, 28 Redshank, 70+ Black-tailed Godwit and 2 Little Egret. 

 Reed Bunting

Further along the sea wall I found both Skylarks and Linnets feeding in piles of tide wrack, but nothing more exotic than still 100+ Red-legged Partridge. I get the impression that more of the things have been released in recent days to restock after the fortnightly shoots took their toll. Oystercatchers are on territory along a regular stretch of shore; do they know it’s just two weeks to the shortest day and almost time to reclaim the most sought after lookout posts? 

 Oystercatcher

At Pilling Water pools were a number of Redshanks, more Egrets, 40+ Pintail, 30+ Teal and about 15 Wigeon, the wildfowl flying mostly high and out to the marsh. 

Pintail

At Fluke Hall I found several Tree Sparrows near the boxes, a Great-spotted Woodpecker, a female Sparrowhawk and a Chiffchaff. 

The old pills worked fine for a couple of hours but I may need a more traditional remedy this evening. Look in soon to Another Bird Blog soon and find out if it worked. 

21 comments:

Carol L McKenna said...

Marvelous nature shots ~ birds and all ~ love the sheep ~ thanks, carol, xxx

EG CameraGirl said...

Take care of your back but I'm glad you were able to get out to get these photos!

Fun60 said...

Glad the storm didn't do too much damage. We were fortunate to have the Thames barrier protecting London. Fortunately it did its job brilliantly.

eileeninmd said...

Phil, I tend to get antsy if stuck in the house for too long too. Great collection of birds. The Reed Bunting is gorgeous and the Whopper Swan in flight is a great capture. What is with the dyed sheep, it is too early for Easter, LOL. Have a happy week!

Cynthia said...

The oystercatcher alone would make it a good birding day for me! Hope your back heals quickly so you can enjoy the birds.

mick said...

I read in the news about the storm that swept through parts of Britain - the winds and water must have been very strong to blow around a great mound of timber and rubbish as in your photo. Interesting to see your Pied Oystercatcher and compare it with the ones I photographed this week - I think that is "snap" again!

David Gascoigne said...

From what we hear on this side of the Atlantic your weather has been quite brutal of late. Sounds like a really interesting walk with lots of birds.

David Gascoigne said...

I don't know quite how but the comment I just left above shows as being from Mick.

Carole M. said...

glad you finally 'got out' Phil! It gets to you being hemmed in too long. Loving the Reed Bunting again

Carole M. said...

glad you finally 'got out' Phil! It gets to you being hemmed in too long. Loving the Reed Bunting again

TexWisGirl said...

beautiful reed bunting and neat shot of the oystercatcher on the fence post!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Lovely birds. I was so thrilled to see over a dozen of two different kinds of birds last weekend...quite a piddling number compared to your counts! Your bird photos are wonderful as always and kind of amazing that there are that many after all that stormy weather. Hope your back continues to improve...that's no fun.

Why are the sheep painted?

Karen said...

Gosh you see a lot of birds on your outings Phil! Nice captures, I like the swans in flight! Hope your back pain eases, I'll be back to check out your more traditional remedy!

Gunilla Bäck said...

Lovely birds! I hope your back gets better soon.

Kay L. Davies said...

I can sure understand about back pain, Phil. I have a feeling I know the origin of mine but finally decided to see a doctor instead of self-diagnosing.
I enjoyed your photos. Is the oystercatcher standing on one foot? And the reed bunting is so cute.
Take care of yourself.
K

Gordon said...

Love the Oystercarcher Phil, hope the back gets better.
All the best Gordon.

Chris Rohrer said...

Windy weather!!! But what a nice find with the swan. I don't always mind that crazy weather but when it comes to lakes and oceans with the waves.....that's a bit different:)No rogue waves for me:)

Russell Jenkins said...

The pills didn't slow down your count, Phil. Remarkable. I like the Whooper with the sheep. It must have been transfixed by those red and blue dyes.

Esther Joy said...

Wow! You are one serious birder! Great shots and post despite back discomfort! Hope you get well soon!

Mary Howell Cromer said...

Love that Reed Bunting...a spectacular image of such and the Whooper Swans are awesome, and oh that is really neat what the shepherds/farmers do with the colours for the Sheep. I have longed to own a Sheep, never will it happen though~

Margaret Adamson said...

HI Phil I hope you back improves quickly. I love the one Oystercatcher and the Bunting.

Related Posts with Thumbnails