Friday, July 5, 2013

Sunny Survey

It was the Cockerham round today - Conder Green, Glasson and Cockersands.

Common Sandpipers continue to pass through with 11 today, joined in the creek by 25+ Redshanks, 1 Curlew and a summer plumaged Spotted Redshank.

Spotted Redshank - Lorenzo L M. / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

At this time of year adults spot-reds look totally different from their autumn and winter cold-grey plumage. Although July seems early for returning migrants from relatively cold northern climes, female Spotted Redshanks leave breeding sites first. Exhausted from producing eggs, it is an advantage for them to arrive at staging areas early and have first pick of the food. Males usually leave next, and juveniles later. These waves are not due to the lack of food on the northern summer grounds, but because there is more food at the staging area for those that arrive first. Female Spotted Redshanks sometimes leave up to a week before eggs hatch, leaving males to look after the youngsters, a breeding and survival strategy adopted by other wader species.

It is a number of years since a mid June outing to the then undisturbed River Ribble found 14 of the black beauties on a tidal pool that was also the site of a Ruff leck. Oh Happy Days.

I counted just 10 Lapwings this morning plus the usual number of Oystercatchers, a pair with 2 well grown chicks and other adults still behaving territorially. And here's proof if any were needed that Oystercatchers eat more than oysters.

Oystercatcher

The juvenile male Goldeneye is still around but a long lonely wait for more to join him in October with for now just 4 Tufted Duck, 2 Wigeon and a few Shelduck for company.

Goldeneye

Small birds and others – 1 Reed Bunting, 4 Tree Sparrow, 2 Whitethroat, 4 Greenfinch, 2 Linnet, 1 Great-spotted Woodpecker, and it's hard to get any passerines into double figures at the moment. Two Stock Dove, 30 Swift and 8 Sand Martin and 1 Grey Heron.

Two Sedge Warblers in song this morning, one at the lay-by the other towards the Stork, the pub that to be strictly accurate should be renamed “The Grey Heron”. The pub dates from 1660 when any large wading bird with long legs, a long bill and long neck would be referred to as a stork.

It was a lovely sunny morning for a look at Glasson Dock and a walk along the canal towpath. I found a single Great Crested Grebe, 6 Goldfinch, 2 Whitethroat, a Chiffchaff in song and 2 Willow Warblers feeding in a sycamore tree although not much else unless you count a Song Thrush, and I guess we really should.

Glasson Canal


Mallard

Cockersands was quiet too with 2 Grey Plover, 6 Curlew, 1 Reed Bunting and 2 Grey Heron moved on by the incoming tide.

Looks like a sunny weekend ahead - hooray.

Linking this post to Camera Critters and id-rather-b-birdin .

23 comments:

Stuart Price said...

Hi Phil. What do you mean whwn you talk about the formerly 'undisturbed' River Ribble? Has something happened recently?

Chris Rohrer said...

The Spotted Redshank is a real stunner. Lovely captures! Hope that weather keeps up!

Margaret Adamson said...

Hi Phil I love the shot of the Spotted Redshank. We only have them here raaely in the winter. Why would you not mention a beautiful Song Thrush??? The refections on teh Mallard duck are great. Margaret

Errol Newman said...

Lucky, Phil. Sum plum Spot Reds are a lovely sight to see with their silver speckles. I'm jealous!

Russell Jenkins said...

Some very nice bird news and I'd love a stroll along that canal and a visit to the pub. The oystercatcher and redshank look stunning in that light.

eileeninmd said...

Nice outing, Phil! The canal reminds me of one here, a path for walking and birding! I love the spotted Redshank, very different looking! Great shots!

Wally Jones said...

What a wonderful read! It's so interesting to observe the ebb and flow of bird life in concert with the seasons, especially when reported with such eloquence.

Perhaps the owners of the pub throughout the years were aware that "proper" birders would never darken the door of an establishment with a wanton disregard for "misidentifying" a stork and have thus enjoyed more affable clientele.

Cheers!

Sophie A. said...

Refreshing set of photos with serene water, clear reflections and of course cute animals. :)

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

I love it: "Oh happy days'
I love the canal photo, too. We have one in SE Ontario, but they are a huge part of your world, aren't they?

Cheers from Cottage Country!

TexWisGirl said...

nice! the only one i see here is mallard. :)

Carol L McKenna said...

Magnificent photography of avian life ~ Wow!

Happy Weekend to you ^_^

sandyland said...

this post is so special to me I love the waders

Lea said...

Beautiful photos and interesting information - thanks!
Have a wonderful week-end!
Lea
Lea's Menagerie

Gunilla Bäck said...

Lovely birds and the canal is beautiful. Today was grey and rainy, but tomorrow will hopefully be a beautiful day.

Lavender Cottage said...

Nice bird photos and I especially like the mallard with its reflection in the water.

Gary said...

Wow they are alike!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Frank said...

I've seen a couple of Spotted Reds in their classic dark, speckled plumage in the last 2 weeks but never close enough for a shot.

Mama Zen said...

Lovely shots!

Carole M. said...

my favourite, the spotted redshank

Anni said...

Wow...that redshank....awesome. And I must add that I LOVE your Lapwing header. Terrific image.

EG CameraGirl said...

Birding has been much slower lately in my neck of the woods than in yours. It's wonderful to hear of so much activity!

Christian Perrin said...

Very interesting info about the Redshank migration sequence, as well as the beautiful photo to accompany it. Thank you!

Ken Schneider said...

Love that rich plumage of the redshank!

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